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Bishop Newman has launched his new venture "Insights" to further

his in-depth studies of the Word of God.  An online round table held each month,

upcoming pastors will have the opportunity to learn from veteran leaders, engaging

in insightful discussions on biblical perspectives.

 

This Months Insights Zoom Meeting will be on the book “One”. 

Here is the synopsis: The debate over the how to define the oneness of 

God has been the fuel for division and an argument that has lasted across 

the centuries. Divided by our denominations, and entrenched in our positions, 

we refused to totally embrace one another. It is time for us to live in the prayer 

of our Lord that we might be ONE.

 

Here are the questions based on the chapters:

 

THE DEBATE 

 

  • What is the difference between the Trinitarian and Oneness views of the Godhead?

  • How do the two views interpret the Bible passages that speak of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?

  • What are the implications of each view for our understanding of God and our relationship to Him?

  • How can we have a more productive and respectful dialogue between Trinitarians and Oneness Christians?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The debate between Trinitarians and Oneness Christians is a complex one, and there is no easy answer. Both sides have valid points, and it is important to consider both perspectives before forming an opinion.

  • It is important to remember that the Bible is not always clear on the nature of the Godhead. There are passages that can be interpreted in both a Trinitarian and Oneness way. This is why it is important to study the Bible carefully and prayerfully, and to seek the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

  • It is also important to be respectful of those who hold different views on the Godhead. We should not dismiss their views simply because they are different from our own. We should strive to understand their perspective, and to engage in dialogue in a spirit of love and humility.

 

 

IN THE BEGINNING 

 

  • What is the significance of the Spirit being referred to as "God" in Genesis 1:2?

  • What does it mean to say that the Spirit is "totally unknowable, incomprehensible, unfathomable, and unimaginable"?

  • How does the author explain the plurality of titles assigned to the office of God?

  • What are the implications of the author's view of the Spirit for our understanding of God and our relationship to Him?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The author's view of the Spirit as "totally unknowable" is a challenge to our traditional understanding of God. We often think of God as being a person who we can know and understand, but the author of this passage suggests that God is beyond our comprehension.

  • The author's explanation of the plurality of titles assigned to the office of God is also challenging. We often think of God as being one being, but the author suggests that God can be understood in many different ways.

  • The implications of the author's view of the Spirit for our understanding of God and our relationship to Him are profound. If God is truly unknowable, then we can never fully understand Him. This means that we must have a humble and reverent attitude towards God. We must also be open to the possibility that God may reveal Himself to us in new and unexpected ways.

INTRODUCTION OF GOD

 

  • Why does God emphasize that He is unique and incomparable?

  • What does it mean that God has no parents, children, or spouse?

  • How does God's self-description in these verses challenge our understanding of God?

  • What does it mean for us to be God's witnesses?

  • What does it mean that God is the only God?

Here are some additional thoughts on these verses:

  • God's emphasis on His uniqueness and incomparability is a reminder that He is unlike anything else in the universe. He is the Creator of all things, and there is no one or anything that can compare to Him.

  • God's lack of parents, children, or spouse is a reminder that He is self-existent and eternal. He does not need anyone or anything else to exist. He is complete in Himself.

  • God's self-description in these verses challenges our understanding of God in a number of ways. For example, we often think of God as being aloof and distant, but these verses reveal that He is personal and involved in our lives. He is also sovereign and powerful, but He is also loving and merciful.

  • The fact that God is the only God has a number of implications for our lives. It means that we should worship and obey Him alone. It also means that we should not fear anything or anyone else, because God is the only one who is truly powerful.

THE BIBLE TESTIFIES OF GOD

 

  • What are the implications of the Bible's testimony of one God for our understanding of God?

  • How does the Bible's testimony of one God challenge our traditional understanding of God?

  • What are the implications of the Bible's testimony of one God for our relationship to God?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The Bible's testimony of one God is a powerful reminder that God is not a divided being. He is not three gods in one, or one god with three parts. He is one God, and He is perfect in His unity.

  • The Bible's testimony of one God challenges our traditional understanding of God. We often think of God as being a person who we can relate to in a personal way. However, the Bible teaches us that God is beyond our comprehension. He is not limited by time or space, and He does not have the same needs and desires as we do.

  • The implications of the Bible's testimony of one God for our relationship to God are profound. If God is truly one, then we must worship Him as one. We must also be careful not to divide His attributes or His works. We must worship Him as the Creator, the Sustainer, the Redeemer, and the Judge.

 

ONE LORD ONE GOD

  • Why does the author believe that the US in Genesis 1:26 is not a reference to another God?

  • What evidence does the author provide to support this claim?

  • What are the implications of this interpretation for our understanding of the Trinity?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The author's interpretation of Genesis 1:26 is a minority view, but it is a well-argued one. The author points out that the Bible never explicitly states that there are three separate persons in the Godhead, and that the term "us" can be used in a generic sense to refer to a group of people. The author also argues that the context of Genesis 1:26 suggests that God is speaking to man, not to another God.

  • If the author's interpretation is correct, it would have a significant impact on our understanding of the Trinity. It would mean that the Trinity is not a doctrine that is revealed in the Old Testament, but rather one that is developed in the New Testament. It would also mean that the Trinity is not a literal description of God, but rather a way of understanding the relationship between God and man.

Ultimately, the interpretation of Genesis 1:26 is a matter of faith. There is no clear consensus among biblical scholars on the meaning of this passage. However, the author's interpretation is a thoughtful and well-argued one, and it is worth considering.

 

 

UNDERSTANDING THE GODHEAD

  • What is the author's definition of the Godhead?

  • What evidence does the author provide to support this definition?

  • What are the implications of this definition for our understanding of the Trinity?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The author's definition of the Godhead is a minority view, but it is a well-argued one. The author points out that the Bible never explicitly states that there are three separate persons in the Godhead, and that the term "Godhead" can be used in a generic sense to refer to the divine nature of God. The author also argues that the context of the passages that mention the Godhead suggest that it is not referring to three separate persons, but rather to the one God who is revealed in different ways.

  • If the author's definition is correct, it would have a significant impact on our understanding of the Trinity. It would mean that the Trinity is not a doctrine that is revealed in the Old Testament, but rather one that is developed in the New Testament. It would also mean that the Trinity is not a literal description of God, but rather a way of understanding the relationship between God and man.

Ultimately, the interpretation of the Godhead is a matter of faith. There is no clear consensus among biblical scholars on the meaning of this concept. However, the author's interpretation is a thoughtful and well-argued one, and it is worth considering.

 

THE ETERNAL SON AND THE EARTHLY SON

  • What is the author's argument for why Jesus cannot be the eternal Son of God?

  • What evidence does the author provide to support this argument?

  • What are the implications of this argument for our understanding of the Trinity?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The author's argument is that Jesus cannot be the eternal Son of God because this would mean that there would have been a time when the Father existed without the Son. However, the Bible teaches that God is eternal and unchanging, and therefore He must have always existed with the Son.

  • The author supports this argument by pointing to several passages of Scripture, including:

    • John 1:14, which says that the Word (Jesus) became flesh and dwelt among us. This implies that the Son was not always flesh, but became flesh at a point in time.

    • Galatians 4:4, which says that God sent forth His Son, made of a woman. This implies that the Son was not always a man, but became a man at a point in time.

    • Hebrews 2:14, which says that Jesus took part of flesh and blood. This implies that the Son was not always flesh and blood, but became flesh and blood at a point in time.

  • The implications of this argument for our understanding of the Trinity are significant. If Jesus is not the eternal Son of God, then this means that the Trinity cannot be understood as three separate persons who have always existed together. Instead, the Trinity must be understood as three distinct roles or offices that are played by one God.

Ultimately, the question of whether or not Jesus is the eternal Son of God is a matter of faith. There is no clear consensus among biblical scholars on this issue. However, the author's argument is well-reasoned and based on sound biblical exegesis.

 

THREE RECORDS IN HEAVEN

  • What are the three records in heaven mentioned in 1 John 5:7?

  • What is the significance of these three records?

  • How do these three records relate to the Trinity?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The three records in heaven mentioned in 1 John 5:7 are the record of the Father, the record of the Word, and the record of the Holy Spirit. These three records are all part of the one record of God, which is the record of His eternal nature and His work in creation and redemption.

  • The significance of these three records is that they show that God is one in essence, but three in persons. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all fully God, and yet they are distinct from each other. This is the mystery of the Trinity, which is beyond human understanding but is revealed to us in Scripture.

  • The three records in heaven relate to the Trinity in that they show how the three persons of the Trinity work together to accomplish God's purposes. The Father is the source of all life and being, the Son is the agent of creation and redemption, and the Holy Spirit is the one who empowers us to live in the new creation.

Ultimately, the mystery of the Trinity is beyond human understanding. However, the three records in heaven give us a glimpse into the nature of God and His work in the world.

 

THE GODHOOD

  • What is the difference between the Godhead and the Godhood?

  • What are the implications of this distinction for our understanding of God?

  • How does this understanding of God affect our relationship with Him?

Here are some additional thoughts on the passage:

  • The author distinguishes between the Godhead and the Godhood by defining the Godhead as "who God is" and the Godhood as "what God does." This distinction is important because it helps us to understand that God is not limited to any one role or function. He is the eternal and unchanging Creator of the universe, but He also takes on different roles in order to interact with us and fulfill His purposes.

  • For example, in the Old Testament, God is often portrayed as the "Father" who provides for His people. In the New Testament, God is revealed as the "Son" who saves us from our sins. And in the book of Revelation, God is seen as the "Spirit" who empowers us to live in victory.

  • This understanding of God as the Godhead who takes on different roles in the Godhood helps us to see that He is always present and active in our lives. He is not distant or uninvolved, but He is always working to bring about His good purposes for us.

  • This understanding of God also helps us to relate to Him in a more personal way. We can come to Him as a Father, a Son, or a Spirit, depending on our needs and circumstances. And we can trust that He will always be there for us, no matter what.

Ultimately, the distinction between the Godhead and the Godhood is a reminder that God is beyond our comprehension. He is greater than anything we can imagine or understand. But He has also made Himself known to us in a way that we can relate to and understand. And He invites us to come to Him in faith and trust, knowing that He will always meet our needs.

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